Race, income, education explain disparities in asthma

Mold, cigarette smoke and pests are common triggers of asthma attacks. They’re also common problems in low-income housing. That helps explain the unequal prevalence of asthma across racial and socioeconomic lines. New research attempts to determine factors beyond race, including education level, insurance status and health literacy, that might help those affected and reduce these unequal burdens. http://bit.ly/2BdwfHr

“Don’t name them” – Criminologist asks journalists to help stop mass shootings

It’s too familiar in America: Breaking news, another mass shooting, old pictures of the suspects, their names splashed across cable news. Instant celebrities. In an interview with Journalist’s Resource, Adam Lankford, a criminal justice professor at the University of Alabama, argues that journalists should not report the names or picture the faces of mass shooting suspects. Such recognition, he says, rewards the perpetrators and fosters contagion and copycat effects. http://bit.ly/2zbIsGJ

Proactive mental health care reduces preventable hospitalizations

Community health services can play a role in promoting both mental and physical health, especially by offering ongoing care to patients with mental disorders. A group of researchers tested how one such resource, local health departments, might affect outcomes for people with chronic physical health conditions and coexisting mental disorders. They found that communities with local health departments that promote and provide mental health care have lower rates of preventable hospitalizations. http://bit.ly/2p91rSw

An Urgently Needed New Year’s Resolution for Those Who Care About Public Education

An Urgently Needed New Year’s Resolution for Those Who Care About Public Education
by janresseger
A worthwhile New Year’s resolution would be to honor educators—the people who feel called to help others realize their promise. We live in an era of attacks on the public schools and school teachers, and even on higher education in America’s world-renowned colleges and universities.

A resolution to honor educators would mean we consult educators about the public policies that shape our schools, but in recent years we have listened instead to politicians, philanthropists, business leaders, and tech titans—Michael Bloomberg, Bill Gates, Arne Duncan, Mark Zuckerberg, and Eva Moskowitz—or Eli Broad, Jeb Bush and Betsy DeVos.

As it happens, John Dewey—a professor of education, perhaps America’s most famous education philosopher, and an education psychologist as well—published a short, readable education creed in 1897
. As an exercise for the new year, indulge yourself by comparing Dewey’s pedagogic creed to the ideas and principles that underpin today’s public education policy driven by business, philanthropy, the tech-savvy, and politicians. Imagine how different our schools might be if school teachers who have studied the philosophy and psychology of education were trusted by the education committees in Congress and across the statehouses.

Here are just four of the concepts explored in Dewey’s “Pedagogic Creed.”
Dewey’s thinking directly confronts what is happening in our schools driven by high stakes test and punish—charter schools dominated by no-excuses compliance—schools with unworkable ratios of students per teacher—schools oriented to college-and-career prep.

janresseger

A worthwhile New Year’s resolution would be to honor educators—the people who feel called to help others realize their promise. We live in an era of attacks on the public schools and school teachers, and even on higher education in America’s world-renowned colleges and universities.

A resolution to honor educators would mean we consult educators about the public policies that shape our schools, but in recent years we have listened instead to politicians, philanthropists,  business leaders, and tech titans—Michael Bloomberg, Bill Gates, Arne Duncan, Mark Zuckerberg, and Eva Moskowitz—or Eli Broad, Jeb Bush and Betsy DeVos.

As it happens, John Dewey—a professor of education, perhaps America’s most famous education philosopher, and an education psychologist as well—published a short, readable education creed in 1897. As an exercise for the new year, indulge yourself by comparing Dewey’s pedagogic creed to the ideas and principles that underpin today’s public education policy driven…

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