Trump’s “beachhead” teams host dozens of former lobbyists

With key jobs in the administration being filled at a slower-than-average pace, members of Trump’s “beachhead” team have a big impact on their agencies.

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price has been mired in questions about his investments in the healthcare industry. As it turns out, some of the people helping him get grounded at the department are also prompting questions about their ties with the industry.

...read more. by Ashley Balcerzak and Niv Sultan Source: Trump’s “beachhead” teams host dozens of former lobbyists

The Life and Death Issue Ignored at Judge Gorsuch’s Confirmation Hearings

The Senate Judiciary Committee grilled Gorsuch about euthanasia and abortion, yet utterly failed to probe his record on capital punishment.

People living next to the neoprene plant in Louisiana’s St. John the Baptist Parish have long felt they suffered more than their share of illnesses. Still, as Sharon Lerner reports, it took the work of several divisions of the EPA over the course of many years to finally convey the scope of the problem — that the plant was pumping out a chemical that gave local residents the highest risk of cancer from air pollution in the country. As the Trump administration moves to undermine what limited ability the agency has to protect Americans from industrial emissions, Lerner lays out what’s at stake.

READ THE FULL REPORT HERE:

The Life and Death Issue Ignored at Judge Gorsuch’s Confirmation Hearings

A Louisiana Town Plagued by Pollution Shows Why Cuts to the EPA Will Be Measured in Illnesses and Deaths

For decades, people living on the little square of land next to the neoprene plant in St. John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana, have felt they suffered more than their share of illnesses.

People living next to the neoprene plant in Louisiana’s St. John the Baptist Parish have long felt they suffered more than their share of illnesses. Still, as Sharon Lerner reports, it took the work of several divisions of the EPA over the course of many years to finally convey the scope of the problem — that the plant was pumping out a chemical that gave local residents the highest risk of cancer from air pollution in the country. As the Trump administration moves to undermine what limited ability the agency has to protect Americans from industrial emissions, Lerner lays out what’s at stake.

READ THE FULL REPORT HERE: A Louisiana Town Plagued by Pollution Shows Why Cuts to the EPA Will Be Measured in Illnesses and Deaths

Go Ahead and Celebrate the Massive Failure of Trumpcare | Eclectablog

 There’s been some finger-wagging that liberals shouldn’t be cheering the Republicans’ huge defeat on Trumpcare.

As everyone knows, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) didn’t actually put the bill up to a vote because it was doomed by defections from moderate Republicans and Freedom Caucus members alike.

And President Trump didn’t know the bill well enough to whip votes, Politico Magazine embarrassingly reports.

Yes, there are many other fights ahead on the debt ceiling, tax policy, Russian interference in our election, etc.

And I don’t think Trump and Ryan are giving up the ghost of killing Obamacare, no matter what they say.

So if Democrats want to take the opportunity to craft some fixes for the Affordable Care Act, I think that’s great. But for the time being, it’s OK to celebrate that a bad policy died.

Because that means:

24 million people get to keep their health insurance.

People won’t see massive insurance rate increases.

People with pre-existing conditions won’t be priced out…

READ THE FULL BLOG POST HERE: Go Ahead and Celebrate the Massive Failure of Trumpcare | Eclectablog

Trump says he never promised to repeal Obamacare quickly. A list of times he did.

Josh VoorheesJOSH VOORHEES

Josh Voorhees is a Slate senior writer. He lives in Iowa City.

Republican leaders in the House pulled their plan to repeal and replace Obamacare from the floor on Friday afternoon once it became clear that it did not have the votes needed to pass.

Speaking to reporters in the Oval Office, Donald Trump suggested that this was simply all part of his plan. “You’ve all heard my speeches,” he said. “I never said ‘repeal it and replace it within 64 days.’ I have a long time. But I want to have a great health care bill and plan—and we will and it will happen.”

Hmm. That doesn’t sound quite right.

Here is a small sampling of all the times Donald Trump promised that repealing and replacing Obamacare would be a quick and relatively painless lift, one that he would get to right away.

READ MORE HERE: Trump says he never promised to repeal Obamacare quickly. A list of times he did.

Rep. John Conyers, Jr. introduces the ‘Expanded & Improved Medicare for All Act’

Expanded & Improved Medicare for All Act

This bill establishes the Medicare for All Program to provide all individuals residing in the United States and U.S. territories with free health care that includes all medically necessary care, such as primary care and prevention, dietary and nutritional therapies, prescription drugs, emergency care, long-term care, mental health services, dental services, and vision care.

Only public or nonprofit institutions may participate. Nonprofit health maintenance organizations (HMOs) that deliver care in their own facilities may participate.

  • Patients may choose from participating physicians and institutions.
  • Health insurers may not sell health insurance that duplicates the benefits provided under this bill.
  • Insurers may sell benefits that are not medically necessary, such as cosmetic surgery benefits.
  • The bill sets forth methods to pay institutional providers and health professionals for services.
  • Financial incentives between HMOs and physicians based on utilization are prohibited.

The program is funded:

(1) from existing sources of government revenues for health care,

(2) by increasing personal income taxes on the top 5% of income earners,

(3) by instituting a progressive excise tax on payroll and self-employment income,

(4) by instituting a tax on unearned income, and

(5) by instituting a tax on stock and bond transactions. Amounts that would have been appropriated for federal public health care programs, including Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), are transferred and appropriated to carry out this bill.

  1. The program must give employment transition benefits and first priority in retraining and job placement to individuals whose jobs are eliminated due to reduced clerical and administrative work under this bill.
  2. The Department of Health and Human Services must create a confidential electronic patient record system.
  3. The bill establishes a National Board of Universal Quality and Access to provide advice on quality, access, and affordability.
  4. The Indian Health Service must be integrated into the program after five years. Congress must evaluate the continued independence of Department of Veterans Affairs health programs.

Source:

 https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/676

John Conyers, Jr. | Congress.gov | Library of Congress

Biography –

CONYERS, John, Jr., a Representative from Michigan; born in Detroit, Wayne County, Mich., May 16, 1929; attended Detroit public schools; B.A., Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich., 1957; LL.B., Wayne State Law School, Detroit, Mich., 1958; lawyer, private practice;

Michigan National Guard, 1948-1950; United States Army, 1950-1954; United States Army Reserve, 1954-1957;

staff, United States Representative John D. Dingell, Jr., of Michigan, 1958-1961;

general counsel for three labor locals in Detroit, 1959-1964;

executive board member, Detroit, Mich., American Civil Liberties Union, 1964 to present;

executive board member, Detroit, Mich., NAACP, 1963 to present;

referee for Michigan workmen’s compensation department, 1961-1963; elected as a Democrat to the Eighty-ninth and to the twenty-six succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1965-present);

one of the managers appointed by the House of Representatives in 1988 to conduct the impeachment proceedings against Alcee Lamar Hastings, judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida; chairman,

Committee on Government Operations (One Hundred First through One Hundred Third Congresses); chairman,

Committee on the Judiciary (One Hundred Tenth and One Hundred Eleventh Congresses).