Keeping retirement weird. 403(b)s and the teacher pension rip off. And the NEA.

Fred Klonsky writes: My state teacher pension alone would never be enough to pay for the retirement travel that Anne and I have been looking forward to, and are enjoying at this very moment.

Tomorrow we will celebrate our 4oth wedding anniversary in the small French village of St. Emilion, in the region of Aquataine.

But in addition to the public pension I earned over 30 years of teaching, we have other savings, including the money I pulled out of my paycheck and placed into a defined contribution annuity called a 403(b).

This article in the New York Times is a must read for teachers who invest, or who invested, in one of these annuities. The Times includes among those who rip off teachers with these less regulated retirement investment plans, NEA Member Benefits.

First, a personal story about the role of the NEA.
Read Fred’s full blog post here: https://preaprez.wordpress.com/2016/10/22/keeping-retirement-weird-403bs-and-the-teacher-pension-rip-off-and-the-nea/

Fred Klonsky

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My state teacher pension alone would never be enough to pay for the retirement travel that Anne and I have been looking forward to, and are enjoying at this very moment.

Tomorrow we will celebrate our 4oth wedding anniversary in the small French village of St. Emilion, in the region of Aquataine.

But in addition to the public pension I earned over 30 years of teaching, we have other savings, including the money I pulled out of my paycheck and placed into a defined contribution annuity called a 403(b).

This article in the New York Times is a must read for teachers who invest, or who invested, in one of these annuities. The Times includes among those who rip off teachers with these less regulated retirement investment plans, NEA Member Benefits.

First, a personal story about the role of the NEA.

When I first became president of my NEA local…

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