Six Clinton delegates on the Platform Committee who voted against a $15 minimum wage.

When 70% of the US economy is based on “consumption” and with the middle class shrinking year after year since the 1970s, why on earth would endorsing stepped inreases in the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour be unacceptable to these six DNC party leaders? Smh…

Fred Klonsky

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State Says Los Angeles Schools Must Spend More on Poor Students and English Learners

Telecommunications manufacturer David Welch and his organization, Students Matter, the group that brought the original anti-teacher-tenure lawsuit Vergara v. California, and Campbell Brown, the former CNN anchor whose Partnership for Educational Justice has been bringing copycat anti-tenure lawsuits across the country, allege that schools are failing to serve their poorest students because tenure is protecting tired, old, lazy teachers and assigning such teachers to the schools that serve children in poor neighborhoods. Never mind that what seems to be happening instead is that very poor children are being assigned the least experienced teachers. And never mind that a shortage of dollars in big city school districts really does seem to be a primary problem.

A year-old report from Bruce Fuller and other researchers at the University of California at Berkeley explains that in Los Angeles, “Sacramento cut spending on K-12 education by one-fifth statewide in the years following 2008—in the wake of the Great Recession. The impact on LAUSD (the Los Angeles Unified School District)… was immense, losing approximately $2.7 billion between 2009 and 2013. But the state has instituted a new Local Control Funding Formula for the purpose of supporting the education of poor children and children learning English. And it turns out there are serious questions about how the new money is being spent by the Los Angeles Unified School District, which needs to address years’ of unmet needs.

The California Department of Education just sided with Public Advocates, a California public interest law firm, which had filed a complaint against LAUSD on behalf of the Community Coalition of South Los Angeles, a complaint charging that the school district is not investing, as required by the new state funding formula, enough new dollars in the education of very poor children and English learners. The complaint says the district has claimed to be increasing spending on vulnerable students while it has instead been counting special education expenditures as though they were providing additional funding for poor students.

Here is the California Department of Education’s recent finding, according to Ed Source:

janresseger

Telecommunications manufacturer David Welch and his organization, Students Matter, the group that brought the original anti-teacher-tenure lawsuit Vergara v. California, and Campbell Brown, the former CNN anchor whose Partnership for Educational Justice has been bringing copycat anti-tenure lawsuits across the country, allege that schools are failing to serve their poorest students because tenure is protecting tired, old, lazy teachers and assigning such teachers to the schools that serve children in poor neighborhoods.  Never mind that what seems to be happening instead is that very poor children are being assigned the least experienced teachers.  And never mind that a shortage of dollars in big city school districts really does seem to be a primary problem.

A year-old report from Bruce Fuller and other researchers at the University of California at Berkeley explains that in Los Angeles,  “Sacramento cut spending on K-12 education by one-fifth statewide in the years following…

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Five Myths Reformers Want You to Believe about Teachers

Five Myths Reformers Want You to Believe about Teachers
By Emily Talmage, educator/writer

Teachers are no strangers to having stories told about them in order to move political agendas forward. During the era of No Child Left Behind, tales of lazy and incompetent teachers helped pave the way for strict accountability measures. Now, as ESSA marches forward with its plans to commodify, digitalize, and outsource education, a new set of myths has begun to circulate. Here are some of the most common fables you’re likely to hear.

Save Maine Schools

Teachers are no strangers to having stories told about them in order to move political agendas forward. During the era of No Child Left Behind, tales of lazy and incompetent teachers helped pave the way for strict accountability measures. Now, as ESSA marches forward with its plans to commodify, digitalize, and outsource education, a new set of myths has begun to circulate. Here are some of the most common fables you’re likely to hear.

  1. We spend most of our time lecturing.

In a 2010 article titled Teachers Unions vs. Online Education, Katherine Mangu-Ward summed it up like this: “A child who was perfectly content with a video stream, an MP3, and a chart flowing past him is suddenly ordered to sit still, shut up, and listen while a grown-up scrawls on a blackboard and delivers a monologue.”

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But here’s the truth: most teachers spend very little time lecturing. At…

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Science suggests genes can hugely influence academic performance — Quartz

Research shows that a student’s genetic makeup can have a strong influence on their academic performance.

Some interpret this to mean there is little that can be done to help those who struggle academically—and that spending extra money on these students to help them succeed is pointless.

But is this the case?

Read the rest of this report here:
http://qz.com/714195/science-suggests-genes-hugely-influence-academic-performance/?utm_source=YPL&yptr=yahoo&ref=yfp

The Disruption of America’s (Broken) Education System – The Atlantic

What if the U.S. education doesn’t need to be disrupted after all?

By JACK SCHNEIDER JUN 22, 2016

Everything in American education is broken. Or so say the policy elites, from the online learning pioneer Sal Khan to the journalist-turned-reformer Campbell Brown. As leaders of the XQ project succinctly put it, we need to “scrap the blueprint and revolutionize this dangerously broken system.”

This, they explain, is the sad truth. The educational system simply stopped working. It aged, declined, and broke. And now the nation has a mess on its hands. But there’s good news, too. As Michelle Rhee’s group, StudentsFirst, declares: Americans can “work together to fix this broken system.” All it takes is the courage to rip it apart.

This is how the argument goes, again and again. The system used to work, but now it doesn’t. And though nobody inside schools seems to care, innovators outside the establishment have developed some simple solutions. The system can be rebuilt, reformers argue. But first it must be torn down.

American education has some obvious shortcomings. Even defenders of the schools can make long lists of things they’d like to change. But the root of the problem is not incompetent design, as is so frequently alleged. Nor is it stasis. Rather, it is the twofold challenge of complexity and scale. American schools are charged with the task of creating better human beings. And they are expected to do so in a relatively consistent way for all of young people. It is perhaps the nation’s most ambitious collective project; as such, it advances slowly.

For evidence of this, one need look only to the past. If the educational system had broken at some point, a look backward would reveal an end to progress—a point at which the system stopped working. Yet that isn’t at all the picture that emerges. Instead, one can see that across many generations, the schools have slowly and steadily improved.

Read the full story here: The Disruption of America’s (Broken) Education System – The Atlantic

Big Education Ape: A teacher protest in Oaxaca, Mexico, turned deadly. The U.S. education debate should take note.

Mexican federal police clash with teachers during a protest against education reform and the arrest of two of its leaders in Oaxaca on Sunday. Patricia Castellanos/AFP/Getty Images
There’s a nastiness to conversations about U.S. education reform, which are characterized by the kind of stark taking-of-sides that’s usually reserved for debates over guns or abortion rights. One side often sees the other as union-busting corporate reformers who’ve never been inside an actual classroom yet are hell-bent on reducing all learning to meaningless, time-destroying tests and evaluations. The other, at its worst, portrays its opponents as parasitic, lazy, abusive teachers who care more about their benefits package than the children they’re supposed to be educating. Both are dangerous, inaccurate distortions that keep divisions within the education community fresh and festering.
But however rancorous the debate gets, the U.S. has never seen anything like what happened in Oaxaca, in southern Mexico, over the weekend, when…

Source: Big Education Ape: A teacher protest in Oaxaca, Mexico, turned deadly. The U.S. education debate should take note.

CURMUDGUCATION: PA: Cybers Are Delusional

CURMUDGUCATIONPA: Cybers Are Delusional
Posted Peter Greene: 25 Jun 2016

It’s been little more than a week since the bricks and mortar portion of the charter school industry took a big, hard swipe at their cyber-siblings. As you may recall, three major charter school groups released a “report” that was basically a blueprint for how to slap the cyber-schools with enough regulation to make them finally behave. The report was rough, noting all of the worst findings about cybers– how they achieve no learning and actually destabilize many students.

The cyber-school industry was not amused. K12, one of the biggest chains in the largely for-profit sector, fired back with its own press release that managed to be feisty without really addressing any of the criticisms.

But in Pennsylvania, one of the Big Three of free range cyber-school activity (Ohio and California are the other two), cybers are trying a different approach…

Read more here: CURMUDGUCATION: PA: Cybers Are Delusional

Ohio Senate race attracts highest outside spending in Congress, big share of dark money | OpenSecrets Blog

Outside groups — including politically active nonprofits like the Koch brothers’ Americans for Prosperity — have spent more money trying to influence the 2016 Ohio Senate race between Republican Sen. Rob Portman and his challenger, Democrat Ted Strickland, than any other congressional contest: $15.5 million so far. The RealClearPolitics polling average currently has the … read more.

Source: Ohio Senate race attracts highest outside spending in Congress, big share of dark money | OpenSecrets Blog

IRS releasing electronically-filed nonprofit tax data | OpenSecrets Blog

The IRS has broken new ground in nonprofit data transparency. On June 16, the IRS released more than one million electronically-filed tax forms in bulk, open, machine-readable form; the filings go from 2011 through the most recent reports, most of which cover 2014. The data is now available for anyone to download from Amazon Web Services (AWS) through Amazon S3. The machine-readable data Form 990 data will provide a more textured … read more.

Source: IRS releasing electronically-filed nonprofit tax data | OpenSecrets Blog

A gaping funding chasm between Clinton and Trump | OpenSecrets Blog

Last month, Donald Trump tweeted that his campaign had “perhaps more cash than any campaign in the history of politics.” New Federal Election Commission filings show that he was very, very wrong. At the end of May, Trump’s campaign had nearly $1.3 million in cash on hand, putting him significantly behind Hillary Clinton’s $42 million. With less money than many congressional campaigns — let alone Clinton and at least one erstwhile … read more.

Source: A gaping funding chasm between Clinton and Trump | OpenSecrets Blog