Reblogs from Electablog

LOLGOP has posted a new item,

‘How to get your ‘Pro-Life Card”, at Eclectablog

You may view the latest post at
http://www.eclectablog.com/2016/04/how-to-get-you-pro-life-card.html

Eclectablog has posted a new item,

‘YOUR LAUGH OF THE DAY: Michigan GOP demands
Dems pay salary of criminal senator Republicans refused to throw out’, at
Eclectablog

You may view the latest post at
http://www.eclectablog.com/2016/04/your-laugh-of-the-day-michigan-gop-demands-dems-pay-salary-of-criminal-senator-republicans-refused-to-throw-out.html

Eclectablog has posted a new item,

‘DON’T MISS IT! – Clean Water Action’s 2016
Great Lake Awards Celebration next Wednesday, April 13, 2016′, at Eclectablog

You may view the latest post at
http://www.eclectablog.com/2016/04/dont-miss-it-clean-water-actions-2016-great-lake-awards-celebration-next-wednesdayapril-13-2016.html

Eclectablog has posted a new item,

‘GUEST POST: What’s next for #PureMichigan?’, at Eclectablog

You may view the latest post at
http://www.eclectablog.com/2016/04/guest-post-whats-next-for-puremichigan.html

 

PBS NewsHour | Here’s the Deal: Speech. Attack. Counterattack. Repeat.

Wisconsin votes today. See results here

. Photo by Jim Young/Reuters

It’s Tuesday, the traditional day for elections and for our pause-and-consider newsletter on politics and policy. We think of it as a mini-magazine in your inbox.

SIDE-BY-SIDE
By Lisa Desjardins, political director
@LisaDNews

Speech. Attack. Counterattack. Repeat. The 2016 campaign has been a scattershot of short-term plot points. We’d like to now sketch more broadly and bring a handy comparison of the remaining candidates. Note: On policy issues, we list the first or most prominent elements named in each candidate’s plan.

HOW TO WIN DELEGATES AND INFLUENCE THE GOP
By Lisa Desjardins

Donald Trump was surprised

, but many political nerds were not, when he learned that winning a state does not mean necessarily winning its — now critical — delegates. Here is our guide to how individual people become Republican National Convention delegates, the group who this year may elect the Republican presidential candidate.

STEP 1: How many? The national Republican party decides how many delegates each state gets. (Each state gets 10 plus one for each Congressional district, then gets additional delegates if it has voted Republican in recent elections.)

STEP 2: What kind? State Republican parties decide how to divide their delegates — at-large, Congressional district, winner-take-all, whatever they like.

STEP 3: Hold a primary or caucus. You can almost ignore this step. While primaries and caucuses can dictate how delegates must vote, they seldom have anything to do with choosing those individual delegates.

STEP 4: Elect the delegates. Each state decides a precise method but generally delegates are elected in two places — at state or local party conventions. Picture a large arena (state convention) or a high school auditorium (local Congressional district convention).

The delegate fight is like any other election, candidates make hundreds of phone calls, pass out stickers, shake hands and work to win over as many fellow Republicans they can. It is a process well worth seeing.

And at the local level you can see it, because often the district conventions are open to the public. AND, you might also be able to vote on who becomes the delegate.

This is because many local conventions often just require you fill out a form and pay a registration fee. (In states with closed primaries you may also need a GOP voting record.) It is meant to attract those interested in the party and can be people with little experience. State conventions, on the other hand, are made up of Republicans elected from local conventions, so these are more likely to be longtime party faithful.

STEP 5: Delegates are elected, and they go to the national convention. Usually they must vote according to the state outcome on the first ballot, but sometime after that they can vote however they like.

To find out if your state or local convention is coming up soon, go to your state Republican party website. If that is no help, send me a tweet

and I’ll look around with you. It truly is a worthy part of the process to observe.

IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED
By Quinn Bowman, Capitol Hill Producer
@quinnbowman

The Senate is back from a spring recess this week, and there continues to be a subtle fissure in the GOP ranks over Merrick Garland’s Supreme Court nomination. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has pledged not to meet with Garland or vote on any Supreme Court nominee until a new president is sworn in next year.

But Sen. Susan Collins of Maine met with Garland today, becoming the second Senate Republican to do so. She had nothing but good things to say about the judge “The meeting left me more convinced than ever that the process should proceed. The next step in my view should be public hearings before the judiciary committee,” Collins said afterward.

Still, Collins is just one moderate Republican in a conference filled with conservatives. Sen. John Boozman of Arkansas also met with Garland this afternoon — but no cameras or reporters were allowed to witness the start of the meeting, as is customary. So of Garland’s three meetings with Senate Republicans so far, one has been conducted in behind closed doors.

Without McConnell’s approval, Garland can’t get a vote. And while Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa has agreed to a breakfast meeting with the judge, most Republicans don’t have plans to see him, let alone force McConnell to change his mind. Here’s the short list of GOP senators who have met with Garland, or announced plans — or expressed interest — in doing so:

  • Have held meetings with Garland: Sens. Mark Kirk (Ill.), Collins and Boozman.
  • Reportedly open to meeting with Garland: Sens. Kelly Ayotte (N.H.), Grassley, Pat Toomey (Pa.), Rob Portman (Ohio), Mike Rounds (S.D.), Jim Inhofe (Okla.), James Lankford (Okla).
  • Open to holding confirmation hearings: Kirk — who memorably said his Senate colleagues should “man up

    ” and hold a vote.

#POLITICSTRIVIA
By Erik Andersen, Online Desk Assistant

Question: On this day in 1951, Ethel and Julius Rosenberg were sentenced to death for passing atomic secrets to the Soviet Union. Which member of the team that prosecuted the Rosenbergs would go on to serve as chief counsel for Sen. Joe McCarthy? Tweet your answers using #PoliticsTrivia; we’ll give a shout-out — and a special prize!! — to the first person to answer correctly.

Last week we asked: What is the most recent Amendment to the Constitution, and when was it ratified? The answer: The 27th Amendment, which prohibits Congress from giving itself a raise. It was ratified May 7, 1992.

Thoughts? Comments? Political jokes? Let us know how we can improve and what interests you by emailing us at NHpolitics@newshour.org.

What’s behind skyrocketing insulin prices?
@EdSilverman
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Our mailing address is:
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The PBS NewsHour is an hour-long evening news broadcast, hosted by Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff which offers news updates, analysis, live studio interviews, discussions and foreign and domestic reports to put the day’s news in context.

Source: PBS NewsHour | PBS

Airing Tonight on PBS NewsHour: Personalized Learning Fuels Data-Privacy Worries (An Education Week Report)

Airing Tonight on PBS NewsHour:
Personalized Learning Fuels Data-Privacy Worries
(An Education Week Report)

Personalized Learning Fuels Data-Privacy Worries

As schools across the country go high-tech, incorporating data-driven educational apps and software into classrooms, fears about the privacy and security of students’ personal information are on the rise. These concerns may be putting the brakes on school district’s efforts to personalize learning, but not in Miami-Dade County, Fla. The 345,000-student district is a pioneer in digital learning, and has given teachers and students access to a host of online apps and programs.

At iPrep Academy, students work almost entirely online. Computer programs collect tons of information about students’ interests, preferences, even the names of their friends, to customize lessons. Although Superintendent Alberto Carvalho is confident that the safeguards in vendor contracts, along with his data-security team, are protecting digital data, the threats are real. Hackers try to infiltrate the district’s system every day, and not too long ago a cafeteria worker with access to the database stole hundreds of students’ names and social security numbers.

John Tulenko of Education Week visits iPrep Academy to see how teachers are using the technology to personalize classroom instruction and what the district is doing to protect student data.

LEARN MORE TONIGHT ON PBS NEWSHOUR.

For full coverage of the data-privacy issue, read Education Week‘s special report, Data: Sharing + Privacy

. And check out other stories on protecting privacy and “big data.”

 

It’s time to rethink liberal arts education in Michigan | Michigan Radio

Instead of being the vehicle to join the middle class that it once was, higher education is now an obstacle that actually prevents access to knowledge and reinforces existing privilege. This was the powerful message of a compelling Economist cover story last year titled America’s New Aristocracy.

The essay argues that college in the U.S. has become a class distinction – a marker of privilege, the way it has traditionally been in England.

The catastrophic rise in tuition is one major factor. Over the past decade, Michigan’s in-state tuition has doubled. During the same period, state support for universities has been cut in half. That shift in funding places the financial burden heavily on individual families and leaves countless students with crushing debt.

Young children with exposure to the best kinds of learning opportunities are much more likely to achieve success as college students. This institutional reality needs to be challenged.

The Economist says another part of this problem is early education. Young children with exposure to the best kinds of learning opportunities are much more likely to achieve success as college students. This institutional reality needs to be challenged. That’s where the liberal arts education comes in. It has the potential to enact great structural changes in the way young people from all backgrounds learn about and participate in the larger world.

Source: It’s time to rethink liberal arts education in Michigan | Michigan Radio

Flint water customers may soon start getting water bills again | Michigan Radio

By the end of this week, Flint residents might start receiving water and sewer bills again.

In February, Gov. Snyder signed a bill giving the city of Flint $30 million to reimburse city residents for water they couldn’t drink safely for the past few years.

Last month, the city of Flint stopped sending out water and sewer bills.

The city was having trouble incorporating a state reimbursement that was expected to reduce bills by about two-thirds. The city has been testing changes to its database to add the credit.

Source: Flint water customers may soon start getting water bills again | Michigan Radio

Wondering Where Ed Reform is Headed Next? Watch this Video. — Save Maine Schools

Recently, a citizen from Baltimore County posted a chilling video to YouTube about the school district’s 270 million dollar 1:1 technology experiment known as “STAT” (Student and Teachers Accessing Tomorrow.) The twelve-minute video features footage of Gus Schmedlen, Vice President of Worldwide Education for Hewlett-Packard’s Printer and Personal Systems, describing the “transformative” power of the […]

via Wondering Where Ed Reform is Headed Next? Watch this Video. — Save Maine Schools

Leader of Long Island Opt Out Explains Why She Opts Out: It is About Her Children — Diane Ravitch’s blog

Jeanette Deutermann, parent leader of Long Island Opt Out, explains here why she will not allow her children to take the state tests. The interesting question she raises is, why are public officials and the media so desperate to compel students to take these tests? The tests provide no useful information to teachers or parents. […]

via Leader of Long Island Opt Out Explains Why She Opts Out: It is About Her Children — Diane Ravitch’s blog

Is Your Child More than a Score? — Diane Ravitch’s blog

If your child is a data point, don’t watch this short video. Don’t watch it if you think your child can be summed up by a number or a test score. But watch it if you see your child as a unique individual, different from every other child and precious to you.

via Is Your Child More than a Score? — Diane Ravitch’s blog

Comment On The Always Saddening Anniversary Of The Death Of Dr. King. — mikethegunguy

Is there the slightest possibility that two political scientists at the University of Illinois just happen to have discovered a possible link between racist attitudes and pro-gun sentiments at the same time that the most successful Republican presidential campaign rests on racial slurs directed at immigrants and a fervent love of the 2nd Amendment? There […]

via Comment On The Always Saddening Anniversary Of The Death Of Dr. King. — mikethegunguy